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How to Give and Receive Feedback (Constructive Criticism) So Everyone is Still Speaking to Each Other Afterwards

Thursday, April 21 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Register for this one-hour webinar.

We all have blind spots: We forget, we make mistakes, we disagree, and we misunderstand. Being able to give and take feedback is how we get back on track, improve productivity, and build trust and respect. Criticism does not necessarily require confrontation. But, many people have been wounded in poorly managed meetings, and most people suffer from some form of conflict avoidance. Preparation and practice can make difficult conversations easier and more productive. And the good news is that some issues are none of our business.

Learn why taking and giving feedback requires the same skills, why finding points of agreement can help navigate conflict, the differences between healthy and unhealthy conflict, the rules of engagement, responding to constructive feedback versus feeling attacked, and what do to when conversations are hijacked by gossip, rumor, red herrings, and hidden agendas.

Following this webinar, you will know how to:

• Resolve conflicts faster and more effectively.
• Reduce conflict avoidance.
• Make it more comfortable for others to seek out feedback.

Presenter: Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries for over 40 years. She focuses on personnel, management, and leadership issues, including marketing, project management, and tech services productivity.

CALL SPONSORED: In order to gain the most impact from learning events sponsored by the CALL grant, we ask that all participants engage fully (attend, participate, discuss and share). If you are unable or not willing to agree to this, please be kind and leave a seat or place for someone else.

Details

Date:
Thursday, April 21
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Event Tags:
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Organizer

LibraryWorks

Registration is closed for this event.

How to Give and Receive Feedback (Constructive Criticism) So Everyone is Still Speaking to Each Other Afterwards